JACKIE DAYTONA – SHE’S SO HOT (Q&A)

If you like The Killers, The White Stripes, Royal Blood, Spoon, Weezer, The Black Keys … you will probably like Jackie Daytona. Big time!

Garage Power Pop from Texas.

Jackie Daytona is Jackie himself and drummer Justin Robinson. The two released their debut ep She’s so Hot a little while ago and it is just great! Big songs, big hooks, big words.

Buy She’s So Hot here

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What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?  

The most fun aspect of making this record was that it was Justin and me, just bass and drums for all of the initial tracking.  Most people don’t realize it, but this is very much a “drum and bass” project.  I wrote all the songs on bass guitar and most of the lead parts are a bass guitar.  I really wanted the record to only consist of drums, bass, and vocals, but as the record developed, I felt that the songs needed a little more to make them shine.

At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special? 

I remember clearly when we were tracking “Hot And Sweaty” and I motioned for a breakdown / solo….we did it and it just worked so well.  I remember looking at him and thinking that we may be onto a project that was more than just “for fun”.

Also, listeners should listen out for the end of “She’s So Hot”- that is Justin and I laughing at the end of the song after tracking it live – including that ridiculous drum solo he plays!

She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?  

Every mixtape I have ever made starts with “Love Fool” by the Cardigans.  I would start there and see what happens.

Do you feel part of a community, the power pop community?  

We are still so new, that every day we get contacted by Power Pop fans who enjoy what we have come up with, and I never could have imagined such a warm reception by a genre of music.  I really look forward to getting to know more fans and artists/bands.

If you could tour the world with 2 other bands, who would you ask to join?  

This is easy.  The Killers and Tom Petty (RIP).

If the budget was unlimited, how would you record the next record?  

Honestly, we wouldn’t do much different.  We’d still record the record in my garage, only I would hire an engineer to aid in the recording process.  During the recording of “She’s So Hot”, I was playing, singing, engineering and producing.  This next time around Id love to focus on the performance side of it and let someone else worry about sounds/levels/compression/EQ/etc.

What’s up for 2018?  

I’m really hoping to start another record in the Fall and release by 2019.  I have most of the new songs written, and I’m ready to get back in the studio.

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Introducing … THE EGO RITUAL

“It has a sound like it was conceived in the late 60’s, given some 70’s guitar and some 90’s swagger and then let loose now!”. That’s how Wayne Lundqvist Ford, the Ice Cream man, describes the music of The Ego Ritual, B-Leaguers’ Jim Strying’s new band.

Let’s ask Jim what is going on.

1. The Ego Ritual, new band, new sound?

Yeah, new band and I guess a new sound, but the big melodies are still there! Everyone is going to bring their own influences to the band’s sound, though we don’t really write to any set of rules, or have a blueprint, we just go wherever it takes us. And it’s taken us to some far out places…

2. You are working on your debut, an ep. What’s there to expect?

Yes, we’re currently in the studio working on the songs that will become our debut, 4 track EP. We thought about doing a full album, but decided to test the water first. If people react well to the EP, we’ll look at doing a full length record. What’s to expect? The unexpected! Big guitars, big drums, big melodies!  A healthy dose of psychedelia! Stay tuned…

3. How did this band come together?

The stars aligned! William James Ward, our guitarist, I hadn’t seen for many years. One day he turns up at my door with a guitar and says, ‘let’s write some songs’ So that’s exactly what we did! Gaz Wilde, our drummer, I had known through other projects, as he owns the studio we record at. He’s a great drummer and an excellent sound engineer and producer. Things just fell into place, we’ve been lucky.

4. Any goals set? Ambitions shared between all members?

Well, at the moment we’re all focussed on getting the EP finished. It’s coming together and sounding great. We’re just taking it one step at a time. As I mentioned, if people like it, we’ll look at doing an album. We’re not setting ourselves unrealistic targets, things will happen if they’re going to happen.

5. When will the ep hit the stores/hit the digital platforms ?

We’re planning to release the EP late summer, probably with a song released a few weeks earlier (with accompanying video)

It’ll be available on both CD and download versions, from our bandcamp. You can keep up to date with all info at our facebook page.

https://www.facebook.com/theegoritual/

The Rallies – Serve (Q&A)

Powerpopaholic writes: The Rallies are a tight four-piece band from Tacoma, Washington fronted by Steve Davis (vocals/guitar), Lee Brown (drums), Jeff Weidman (guitar), and Rick Jones (bass). Fans of The Rembrandts, Matthew Sweet, and Crowded House will really enjoy the Rallies sound.

Sweet Sweet Music talked to Steve

1) What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?

For me the fun was the creative and collabortive process in the studio. The experimentation and trying out ideas on the spot was very cool. Hope to get back there sometime soon and record our next album.

2) At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special?

I’m not sure there’s ever a point when you have a thought like that about your own music, but I have had it about others. I can tell you I’ve had moments during the initial song writing and creation that on the first playback of a new song its brought a big smile to my face. 🙂 Also there’ve been times during the recording process in studio when the tracks are first being mixed that an old song somehow sounds new again, that’s a cool feeling.

3) The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?

I’m pretty sure that I don’t know what the “music industry” really is… which probably shows that I’ve never actually been a part of it. So I’m probably not qualified to answer this question. But I can say that as a music listener when I go searching for good new music that I’m not browsing through the standard “music industry” channels, I can’t seem to find it there.

4) She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?

This sounds like a question right out of the John Cusack movie High Fidelity, which is a great movie by the way. John’s character Rob said “The making of a great compilation tape, like breaking up, is hard to do and takes ages longer than it might seem. You gotta kick off with a killer, to grab attention. Then you got to take it up a notch, but you don’t wanna blow your wad, so then you got to cool it off a notch. There are a lot of rules.”. So with those rules in mind, how about this song order; Still Gonna Want You, You Don’t Know, Every Now And Then, So Right, These Are The Words.

5) The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?

For me as a songwriter the answer is simple, the success is in the completion of the album. The culmination of all that time, energy, and money is something that all the people involved in creating that music should be proud of.

Buy here

PACIFIC RADIO – Pretty, but killing me

‘Pretty, but killing me’ is one of my favorite records of last year. Released in December, so still as fresh as fresh can be. Pacific Radio combines all there is to like: Power Pop, Garage – and Indy rock. Catchy as hell, all songs. I mean ALL SONGS.

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PACIFIC RADIO IS:

 

Joe Robinson:  Guitar and Lead Vocal
Joe Stiteler:  Bass
Kyle Biane:  Guitar
Hyke Shirinian:  Drums

 

What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?
JR: The first day we recorded at Conway Studios it felt real.  Tracking in a place with that unique vibe and history really reinforces the fact that it isn’t amateur anymore.

 

JS:  We recorded three songs in Austin in the middle of March and SXSW, that had to be the most fun.

 

KB:  I think the biggest fun for me is tweaking the arrangements. We typically play the songs live for quite a while before we take them to the studio. When we finally get to record them it is fun to invent new things to make them come alive on the album.

 

HS:  Tough question for me.. The recording process is always a blast. Though so is touring it!

 

 

At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special?
JR:  I got Pro Tools and started “idea recording” songs. People kind of flipped out. That sparked the confidence I needed. They continued to get better and better as the band put their footprints on them, and here we are.

 

JS:  When we showed up to Conway Studios and started tracking drums.  It’s a special place and we were honored to be there.

 

KB:  When JR played me a demo of the song “Katie” I remember thinking we were onto something.

 

HS:  The whole process just feels special.  The way it has all come together, you know?

 

The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?

JR:  It has brought anxiety. It hasn’t brought a Lamborghini.

 

JS:  We’re adapting to the new process of cyber interaction.  A long way from the times of handing out flyers in person or spray painting our logo onto a sidewalk.

 

KB:  I think it always has been a non-traditional industry, and with the internet’s role becoming such a large factor, the “changes in the music business” are just coming faster and faster. I don’t think that we have missed or gained anything, I can say however, we go into work everyday not knowing what to expect. And that can be kind of exciting.
She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?

JR:  “Skyway” The Replacements
      “Rave On” M. Ward
      “I Only Want You” Eagles of Death Metal
      “Peg” Steely Dan
      “Roadrunner” Modern Lovers

 

JS:  “Every Breath You Take” The Police
      “Tyler” The Toadies
      “Keep On Loving You” REO Speedwagon
      “Walk” Pantera
      “This Love” Pantera

 

KB:  “Across the Sea” Weezer
      “Overcaffeinated” Yellowbirddd
      “I Only Have Eyes for You” The Flamingos
      “Caroline No” The Beach Boys
      “Debra” Beck

 

The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?

JR:  Pacific Radio is a “success”, but there is plenty of room in my bank account for more “success”

 

JS:  Success is the journey, not the destination.

 

HS:  To me… It already is. It was a huge endeavor and we’re all proud of it


KB:  I am with Hyke, this whole adventure is a blast, and we are constantly setting new high water marks for ourselves. I am just glad we get to keep doing it.

 

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THE MYLARS – MELODY RECORDS

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The music of The Mylars has been compared to Bruce Springsteen and Rick Springfield. Heartland rock and Power Pop.

 

Most important, Melody Records contains 9 quality songs.

 

Sweet Sweet Music talked to Danny and Quig.

 

 

What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?

 
Actually, the thing that was the most fun for us was just sitting back on the last day of mixing and listening to the record in its entirety. It was definitely a very proud moment for The Mylars.

 
At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special?

 
We knew we were on to something special right from the very beginning of the writing process. Every song took on a life of its own and each one brought with it a sense of new excitement.

 
The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?

 
The music industry has certainly changed a lot. Along with the change comes the sense of freedom to write and record exactly what we wanted, how we wanted.

We were able to capture the sound we were hearing in our heads without the outside distractions and influences of people with a different agenda.
It also gave us the ability to own 100% of the rights to our future.

 

 

 

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She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?

 
1) I Melt with You- Modern English
2) Hold Me Now- Thompson Twins
3) If You Leave- OMD
4) Don’t You Forget About Me- Simple Minds
5) When it comes down to making out, Whenever possible put on side one of Led Zeppelin IV

 
The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?
We believe a record goes thru many successes. The fact that the record is out in the world and that people are truly enjoying it is definitely a success for us on a certain level.
We believe that the ultimate success for this record would be for every person who truly loves power pop rock as much as we do to have the chance to enjoy it as much as we enjoyed making it.

 

THE STANLEYS – THE STANLEYS

“If there’s a better pure power pop album that’s been released in 2017, I’d like to hear it. In the meantime, I’d like to hear ‘The Stanleys’ four or five more times. Grade: A” – Goldmine Magazine (US)

Mark Di Renzo ‘explains it all’.

What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?

There can be frustrating moments along the way when making an album but I do feel for me it’s pretty much all fun. The most rewarding aspect of making an album is being part of the journey of each song starting as just an idea, then slowly building all the solid foundations, then listening back writing and adding new parts, taking away things, trying ideas and sometimes accidentally and unintentionally adding awesome parts, then finally finishing a song that is ready to be released to the world!

WATCH and/or BUY

At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you know you were on to something special?

For me it was once we’d written and recorded the first half of the album. At that point I was so excited about that half and I knew we all wanted to write more songs we felt were just as good as the first half of the album or even better!   I think musicians like myself and others can be their own biggest critics.  Therefore, if you can get to a point where you are very excited about your own work and know that no matter what anyone else thinks you love it, that is a great place to be.

The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?

If we start with the “what nots” I feel the main thing is the lessening in value of music as a product.  Its obviously a lot harder to sell and make revenue from physical and digital music than it has been in the past.

However, the internet (via music blogs and social media) is a great medium for discovering new music from all over the world and it has made the world a much smaller place.  It has helped The Stanleys to connect with power pop lovers from all around the world to assist with releasing and promoting our music and organising tours overseas.  We’ve been lucky enough to play gigs in many places in Europe and USA as well as a few places in Asia and I hope we can visit some more places in this big world of ours!

She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?

That’s a tough one to answer without knowing the actual girl I’m dating but whomever she might be I’d like some variety in there so these 5 below might work well together:

Pavement – Stereo

Jet – Rollover DJ

The Stone Roses – Waterfall

The Smithereens – Too Much Passion

Prince – 1999

The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?

To me the record is already a success and I am very grateful. To have three labels in different parts of the world invest some money and their time and effort into releasing the album, many music journalists from different parts of the globe say lovely things about it, many people come watch us on tour and many radio DJs from all over the world play songs from the album on their shows makes us very happy.

And now at the end of the year to be included in some Best of 2017 lists, the album’s reception has really been way beyond our expectations. I hope we can get back on the road and tour again next year to meet some more lovely people around the globe.  It’s a wonderful thing to be able to share your music with people!

2017 was a punk rock year for Sweet Sweet Music

2017 was a punk rock year for Sweet Sweet Music.

01. Japandroids – Near to the Wild Heart of Life

02. The Menzingers – After The Party

03. The Lillingtons – Stella Sapiente

04. Together Pangea – Bulls and Roosters

05. Hot Water Music – Light it Up

06. Pacific Radio – Pretty, but killing me

07. The Front Bottoms – Going Grey

08. Citizen – As You Please

09. Brand New – Science Fiction

10. Acid Tongue – Babies

ED RYAN – Furious Mind

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“Furious Mind follows on all that was great about Roadmap. The songs are beautifully constructed taking up the rockier space in Power Pop. Loads of hooks, soaring choruses, everything you need from an album.”…I Don’t Hear A Single 

“It is like an album of singles, all killer, no filler and with more hooks than a Chinese fishing fleet…get it!”… Ice Cream Man

“Pleasing melodies, weeping guitars. There’s something here for everybody”…POWERPOPNEWS.COM 

Furious Mind received some great reviews because it is a great record. It’s as simple as that.

 

 

It sounds like every now and then you like to play outside. Outside the Power Pop marketplace. Can you share your view on this?

I have very eclectic tastes in music and that informs what I like to write and play. I just like very strong melodies no matter the genre…I do prefer the harder rocking side of things and love a good guitar solo.

My first musical training was playing jazz drums and as an adult I went back to school to get my masters in musical composition, so I’m classically trained as well, but I love to rock!

My all-time favorite album is Buffalo Springfield Again…it includes everything from garage, folk, country, jazz, orchestral, psychedelia and a little power pop.

Variety keeps me from getting bored. Power pop is my favorite, but I have entire albums worth of more hard rock, prog pop and rootsy/acoustic songs in the can. Hopefully, it’s all good music no matter what it’s called!

If you listen to Roadmap and Furious Mind you can say you have a style of your own. How would you describe it?

On the musical side of things, my music is melodic but hard rocking for the most part. I love the juxtaposition of a catchy melody over a band sound with the attack of The Who or Humble Pie with a Beck/Ronson type lead guitar.

Lyrically a little dark but hopefully with a sense of humor. Another huge influence is the Glam era of the early seventies and art pop like John Cale, Kevin Ayers, Peter Gabriel etc. So…catchy, rocking and a little dark!

 

How many Pink Floyd records did you play before you recorded the guitar solos on Take Me Home 😊?

 

Ha! Actually, Gilmour live in Gdansk is a touchstone. I love emotional, dramatic blues-based solos that never lose their sense of melody. So that was definitely in the back of my mind while recording!

 

Rocket Ship is my favorite song. After a year of extremely hard work at the office, this can easily become my 2018 theme song. People like this one a lot, do they?

 

Yeah, that seems to get to people. I wrote it in about 30 minutes and recorded most of it the same day. I mistakenly didn’t release that as the first single since it doesn’t actually have a proper chorus!

 

 

In my case, the Rocket Ship represents my home studio…everyone needs a place to escape to and that’s mine! I have to say that the whole album, and that song, in particular, benefited greatly from the drumming of Christopher Ryan of The Anderson Council!

 

What will 2018 look like?

In 2018 I’m looking forward to having both Roadmap and Furious Mind available on cd’s through Ray Gianchetti at KoolKatMusik.

Beyond that I already have demos of the next album happening. A friend of mine said, boy, you’re really churning them out. Though he didn’t mean it as an insult I felt like…churning them out? I don’t think so. I only now have the technology to record but I’ve been writing music for decades.

Furious Mind was all new material but I have a fairly vast back catalog of good tunes. I know if you put out too much, people de-value you…or get sick of you.

That being said, when guys that I respect that were around my age, like Tommy Keene and Pat DiNizio pass I think…I better get cracking. So…maybe another album by the end of 2018.

I could never do a Pollard and release three a year, but once a year could happen! I’m very grateful for the support of the podcasters and bloggers who have helped to give me an audience.

TALK SHOW HOST – Not Here to Make Friends

TWO RECOVERING PUNKS AND AN INDIE ROCKER WALK INTO A BAR.

And Chris (guitar/vocals) answered the questions about Not Here to Make Friends.

Talk Show Host is an indie punk trio from Toronto, Canada. The band has been playing together since 2015 and has two EPs under their belt. Their 2016 release, Perfectly Competent, earned a 7/10 review from Exclaim! magazine and drew comparisons to Green Day, Against Me! and Bob Mould.

 

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What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?
Recording with John Dinsmore was lots of fun – he’s got a great space and he let me use his 50-year-old hollow-body Gibson. For me, I think the day I spent recording the guitar leads was the most fun I’ve ever had in a studio – the vocals were done and I didn’t have to worry about the lyrics anymore, and we got to add all the little flourishes that we wished we’d had time for on the previous two EPs but didn’t get around to.
At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special?
I can’t speak for Fab & Sean, but my overwhelming self-doubt keeps me from ever being sure of this. I still get cold sweats when I think about the weeks leading up to recording and the sleepless nights I spent writing and rewriting the lyrics. Even after listening to the first mixes, which sounded incredible because Olive is a genius, it took me a few weeks to accept that we did, in fact, have a bunch of songs worth releasing.
The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?
The fact that we can self-release our stuff and still have people in other countries listen to it is the biggest thing. For the most part, we are so far removed from the actual music industry that it makes us laugh sometimes. We’re a good fucking band. We know it and the people who hear us know it, but optically, we’re irrelevant. We’re three white dudes in our mid-30s playing 90s throwback guitar rock in 2017. We don’t have a sexy narrative so any attempts at getting the attention of anyone in the actual industry are generally a waste of time. We’ll keep doing what we do until someone notices. If they don’t, fuck ’em.
She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mixtape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?
1) Tom Petty, “American Girl” (top five of all-time)
2) Paramore, “Hard Times” (one of the catchiest damn songs of 2017)
3) Weezer, “Do You Wanna Get High?” (every tape requires some =w=)
4) The Velvet Underground, “Rock & Roll” (I’m just currently obsessed with “Loaded”)
5) Andrew WK, “Party Hard” (no explanation necessary)
Holy shit, that’s an awesome mix tape.
The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?
It was a success the second we finished it. These days, you can’t really measure it any other way. If you set the bar high in terms of songwriting & sound fidelity and you meet it, then that in itself is a success. We know we won’t see a dime from it and we know that Punknews isn’t going include it on any year-end lists, but we know we made a solid record, so we’ll just coast on that smug definition of success for now 🙂
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Chris Catalyst – Life Is Often Brilliant

Chris Catalyst talks about his new record Life Is Often Brilliant.

Read and find out what he has to say about ‘fame and fortune’, recording drums, managers, guitar techs, Bowie and The Tubes.

But if you haven’t heard the record yet, you better do some listening first because it is just great.

Especially if you like Elvis Costello, XTC, Oasis … you will be in for a treat.

 

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What was the biggest fun during the making of the last album?

 

Finishing it. I loved every second of making it, but it was a long, laborious task, which got a little lonely at times due to it being a solo pursuit (along with my intrepid producer pal Andy Hawkins).

Recording the drums was pretty special, though – I’d always wanted to play drums on a record, and it was a great way to get out of my comfort zone, which (as we all know) is where the fun stuff happens.

 

At what point, during writing, rehearsing, recording, did you knew you were on to something special?

 

Honestly? These days I just write, and record, and have faith that it’s going to turn out okay. I’ve never written a song that I’m not proud of in some way, and I feel if I continue to apply the same quality control and meticulous standards that I’ve always done, then it will prove to be good. Or, at least, good enough.

The special bit came later when a small but perfectly formed bunch of people shelled out to buy it, and seemed to enjoy it.

Actually, I tell a lie, there was a point when we were mixing the song ‘Far’. We were looking at the second verse, and producer Andy and I came across a bunch of sampled drum loops (which was how I’d always imagined the album having a load of). We distorted the shit out of it and cut all the vocals up in that section… that was a real ‘that was the sound in my head’ moment.

 

The music industry has changed a lot (or so they say). What did it bring you? And what not?

 

I’ve never been a part of any music industry… luckily. The closest I’ve got is being a guitar tech for a couple of name bands, and seeing the schmoozing and bollocks first hand is equal parts boring and sickening.

A band I know recently sacked their sound guy because the manager told them to.

I couldn’t work in a world like that. I’ve been lucky to never had to sign a contract, never owed anyone a penny, but still managed to be self-sufficient, due to a combination of hard work and good fortune.

Not to mention that small but perfectly formed bunch of people I mentioned earlier.

 

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She tells you she will decide on a 5-song-mix tape if there is going to be a second date. Which 5 would you put on?

 

This would change day to day but today it would be:

Kids In America – Kim Wilde

Electricity – Spiritualized

White Punks On Dope – The Tubes

Boys Keep Swinging – David Bowie

I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times – Beach Boys

I always like finishing with a ballad.

 

The meaning of ‘success’ has changed over the years. When will the new record be a success?

Success is defined and measured very differently by different people – and it seems my definition is at odds with a lot of my peers. I am not interested fame or fortune. So as long as I can get to bend my creative elbow, write some songs and enjoy myself with a bunch of my goodest friends, then that’ll do for me.